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Financial Advisor - CRC® CRPC® CIMA®

Carissa Palm

    Meet Carissa.

    I’m honored by the trust our members place in me. A financial plan – at any stage of life – is not just numbers on a page, it’s a reflection of who you are, what’s important to you, and where you want to go.

    Work doesn’t feel like a job to me, but when I’m technically off I love reading, watching my kiddo play soccer, and volunteering (I’m especially passionate about children and the elderly – they are the bedrocks of a society).

    Whether it’s an investment or a different way of thinking about money, I’m excited to help you look for the opportunities in your own life.

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    Schedule a meeting with Carissa.

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    Couple sitting at their kitchen island talking and looking at a laptop

    Ask me anything.

    On average, how much of my paycheck should go to retirement?
    Averages work on paper, but not in real life – so I want to see you step forward from where you are. If you’re putting in 0%, let’s start with 2% and see how that feels. Six months later, maybe we can bump it up.
    Let’s say you have $2,000. How would you invest it?
    This is a highly personal question, and it’s different for everyone! I would put $500 in a custodial account for my daughter, $500 in a Roth for my stepson, $500 in my own investment account (tech-focused), and I would “invest” $500 in a closet organization system to ensure that my husband isn’t frustrated when he opens the door. Does that count?!
    I am thinking of switching my assets to Wings. Why should I?
    In my career I have worked with some of the largest financial firms in the country, and met advisors from coast to coast. Working in a big-name company is a tough role, and the pressure can be intense. I can’t imagine working for a “recognized” firm, and knowing I could lose my job if I didn’t sell enough life insurance…but that’s exactly what happens. Wings is big enough to have scale and resources, but small enough to escape quotas and unrealistic management expectations.